TO HEAL A WORLD

160 YEARS OF PHOTOGRAPHY FROM THE COLLECTIONS OF THE RED CROSS AND RED CRESCENT

4 July - 25 September 2022

10.00 AM - 07.30 PM

TICKETING

To Heal a World is the result of over two years of research within the archives of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement. The exhibition includes more than 600 images, dated 1850 to the present, from that underexplored collection. Most of the photographs on display were taken to inform the public about urgent humanitarian issues, while others were intended for internal use. Work by some of photography’s biggest names – including members of Magnum Photos – is presented alongside images taken by humanitarian workers themselves and a project by Alexis Cordesse, who collected personal photos from men and women who fled Syria. Multiple points of view converge to explore humanitarian imagery and the complexity of work in the field beyond its representation in photographs.

Exhibition curators: Nathalie Herschdorfer and Pascal Hufschmid.
Collections: the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Museum (MICR), the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC). Exhibition co-produced by the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Museum and the Rencontres d’Arles.
Publication: To Heal a World: 160 Years of Photography from the Collections of the Red Cross and Red Crescent, Textuel, 2022.

With support from the Swiss Confederation, the Republic and Canton of Geneva, and the City of Geneva.

  • Institutional partners

    • République Française
    • Région Provence Alpes Côté d'Azur
    • Département des Bouches du Rhône
    • Arles
    • Le Centre des monuments nationaux est heureux de soutenir les Rencontres de la Photographie d’Arles en accueillant des expositions dans l’abbaye de Montmajour
  • Main partners

    • Fondation LUMA
    • BMW
    • SNCF
    • Pernot Ricard
    • Kering
  • Media partners

    • Arte
    • Lci
    • Konbini
    • Le Point
    • Madame Figaro
    • France Culture