Guide for photographers

How to prepare your venue

Portfolio reviews are a special moment of encounter and exchange between photography experts and participants. These reviews are organized in 20-minutes private meetings with a professional of your choice whom you show your work to. It is a rare opportunity to meet professionals that are actually aware of the photography’s world’s realities and get valuable feedbacks on your practice. It is therefore important to prepare your venue to make the most of these meetings.

1- Upstream
First of all, it is very important to wonder why you want to take part to those reviews. What are you waiting for a priori? How would you qualify your approach when going to the meeting? Whether you are a professional or an amateur, being able to answer these questions will enable the expert to “situate” you work and, thus, adapt his (or her) comments and criticisms (positive or negative). But this also allows you to detach yourself from your work so that you can receive criticisms in the best possible conditions. It is also important to do some researches on the experts you will meet so that you – and them!- can make the most of these exchanges.

2- Punctuality
Each expert meets 10 photographers on half a day. Punctuality and precise timing are absolutely essential during portfolio reviews. Even a few minutes difference has an impact on all meetings. Each meeting starts and ends at a precise time that could therefore not be exceeded (even if you were late). Your schedule is available on your account. We strongly recommend you to print it after having done all necessary modifications and have it with you for the reviews’ week.

3- Business cards
As portfolio reviews are a way to reinforce and extend your network, remember to bring business cards. Illustrating them it with one of your shown picture could be a good idea :).

4- Select your series
Remember to carefully choose the series you will show. We generally advice to limit them to 2 or 3 maximum. And the numbers of photographs per series to 20.

5- Introducing your series
You must be able to introduce your work to the expert you will meet, to give him the keys to comprehend your series. Be careful not to tell too much about it or be too interventionist when it comes to how to consider your work! Your images have their own language: let the expert enjoy their discovery and, above all, share with you their own comprehension and interpretation of it.

6- Material support
If you show a printed portfolio, pay attention to your pictures’ quality. Be careful not to present a turned down, crumpled work... In the case of a digital portfolio, remember to take your computer or tablet: we do not provide them. Please note that the internet access on the reviews’ place is uncertain: we do not recommend you to show online documents (online gallery, website...). Be also careful to fingerprints: feel free to take a duster with you to clean your screen, or a pair of white gloves to offer to reviewers if necessary.

7- Taking notes
Remember to bring something to take notes: even if that’s what we often think, we do not always remember the feedbacks we get. Plus, it can be very interesting to let a little time between the review itself and the re-reading of your notes: the expert’s feedbacks’ significance would probably not be the same.

8- And after…
At the end of the week, we invite you to keep all experts you met updated with your projects, via newsletters for instance.  

Our team is at your disposal should you have any question: feel free to ask us! And note that portfolio reviews are, above all, a friendly and constructive time to enjoy!

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